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Energy

The 2001 position (the base case) of energy consumed by tourists visiting the South West was calculated using data on energy consumption during spring, summer and autumn for various types of tourist accommodation, combined with the number of nights spent by tourists in each type of accommodation.

A number of tourism energy scenarios were calculated to illustrate various options for energy management. Three scenarios are presented here, covering increased tourist numbers and energy saving measures.

The base case and results of scenarios are presented in Table 1.

Table 1
Estimated energy consumption by tourists in the South West, by accommodation type, for base case and scenarios
 
Accommodation type Base case energy consumption Scenario 1: with energy saving measures Scenario 2: extended season & increased tourist numbers Scenario 3: scenario 2 with energy saving measures
Total GWh 4,512 2,707 9,723 6,813
of which…  
Serviced* 1,232 739 2,639 1,797
Self catering 820 492 2,046 1,449
Touring caravans/tents 125 75 226 160
Static vans/holiday centres 215 129 387 274
Group/campus 105 63 241 170
Second homes 102 61 212 150
Boat moorings 40 24 82 58
Other 231 138 479 339
Friends & relatives 1,642 985 3,411 2,415
* Serviced accommodation includes: hotels, inns, guesthouses, B&Bs and serviced farms.
Note: Totals may differ due to rounding.
Sources: CREM, 2000, LSGSW, 2000 and SWRRG, 2003

Energy scenario 1: Best practice

What is the effect on energy consumption of good housekeeping, with retrofit and refurbishment options, applied throughout all tourist accommodations in the South West?

To derive this scenario, the following conditions were assumed:

  • By combining good housekeeping with retrofit and refurbishment options, as much as 40% energy savings can be achieved (CREM, 2000).
  • The number of tourist nights (105 million (South West Tourism, 2001)) and tourist accommodations (16,600 (SWRRG, 2003)) remain the same as 2001 figures.

Under these conditions, the South West region would be able to decrease the amount of energy consumed in tourist accommodation by 40% from 4,510 GWh to 2,710 GWh per year. Table 1 summarises the findings for Scenario 1.

Energy scenario 2: Extending the tourist season with current energy management practices

How will energy consumption by tourists in the South West increase, if the tourist season is extended into winter, and tourist numbers increase by 80%?

To derive this scenario, the following conditions were assumed:

  • During the winter season, energy consumption per tourist night is almost three times greater than during summer, due mainly to increased heating of rooms (CREM, 2000).
  • The number of tourists increases by 80% (LSGSW, 2000).
  • There is a more even spread of visitors throughout the year.
  • Energy management is the same as in 2001.

Under these conditions, the South West region would see an increase in the amount of energy consumed in tourist accommodation from 4,512 GWh to 9,723 GWh (an increase of 115%). Table 1 summarises the findings for Scenario 2.

Energy scenario 3: Extending the tourist season while implementing energy saving measures

What is the effect on energy consumption in tourist accommodation, if the tourist season is extended into winter, and tourist numbers increase by 80%, while implementing energy saving measures?

To derive this scenario, the conditions for scenario 2 were assumed, except that energy saving measures - good housekeeping with retrofit and refurbishment options - are implemented.

Under these conditions, energy use in tourist accommodations increases by 50% to 6,813 GWh although tourist numbers increase by 80% and extend substantially into winter. The results are shown in Table 1.

Reduction of the ecological footprint

Figure 1 compares the 2001 base case energy ecological footprint of tourists in the South West, with energy scenarios 1, 2 and 3. Scenario 1 illustrates the improvements achievable if best practice options were applied to all tourist establishments in the South West. Scenario 2 illustrates the large increase in the energy ecological footprint if the tourist season and numbers increase under current energy management. Scenario 3 illustrates the result of implementing energy saving measures in the situation of increasing tourist numbers. For further comparisons and variations on the scenarios presented here, see Further Information.

Figure 1
Tourism energy base case and scenario ecological footprints for the South West

fig 1