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Product flows

In 2001, the South West manufactured over 17 million tonnes of finished products, and consumed approximately 26 million tonnes of products. Almost 10 million tonnes of 'non-metal mineral products' were produced, by far the largest quantity of all products (38% of the total). In comparison, 'coke, redefined petroleum products and nuclear fuel' and 'machinery and equipment' contributed towards the second highest volume of products manufactured, at 25% of the total. Table 5 provides a summary of product flows through the South West, by SIC category, in 2001.

Table 5
Product flows through the South West, in 2001 ('000 tonnes)
 
Product Production Imports Exports Stock changes* Apparent consumption % of total consumption
Total products 17,368 15,848 10,288 22 26,394 100%
of which…  
Food & beverages ** ** ** ** 3,445 13%
Tobacco 8 23 10 ** 21 <1%
Textiles 24 113 45 ** 91 <1%
Leather, clothes, wearing apparel & fur 12 31 10 ** 34 <1%
Leather luggage, handbags & footware 3 110 799 ** -685 <1%
Wood & cork 539 1,010 97 ** 1,452 6%
Paper pulp, paper & paper products 431 603 169 ** 865 3%
Publishing, printing & recorded media 246 61 37 ** 271 1%
Coke, refined petroleum products & nuclear fuel 3,141 512 649 22 3,025 11%
Chemicals & chemical products 259 840 647 ** 452 2%
Rubber & plastic 283 295 180 ** 398 2%
Non-metal mineral products 9,872 309 242 ** 9,938 38%
Basic metals 3 134 77 ** 60 <1%
Metal products 68 282 281 ** 69 <1%
Machinery & equipment 1,143 6,571 5,411 ** 2,303 9%
Office machinery & computers 27 768 514 ** 281 1%
Other electrical machinery & apparatus 52 3,162 395 ** 2,819 11%
Telecommunications, radio & television 67 115 92 ** 90 <1%
Medical instruments, watches & clocks 282 404 137 ** 550 2%
Motor vehicles, trailers & semi-trailers 149 269 180 ** 239 1%
Other transport vehicles 450 54 273 ** 231 1%
Furniture & miscellaneous manufactured products 307 181 42 ** 447 2%
* Plus (+) equals a removal to stock (stores) and minus (-) equals an addition to stock.
** No data available.
Note : Totals may differ due to rounding and data gaps. Double counting has been removed
Note: In some instances, such as 'leather luggage, handbags & footwear' primary data was lacking. For this reason, figures should be used with caution. See the Technical Report for further discussion on data limitations.
Note: Apparent consumption is production plus imports minus exports over a defined time period. This figure can be assumed as the actual volume of materials consumed within the South West. Stock of materials remaining from the previous year are also added.
Sources: DEFRA, 2000 & 2003; ONS, 2001a & 2003a and University of Plymouth, 2003.

The aerospace industry

The aerospace industry is one of the most important and economically influential industrial sectors in the South West, one of Europe's premier aerospace industry regions. Hubs of activity are based in Bristol, South Gloucestershire and Taunton. BAE Systems, Rolls Royce Aerospace and Airbus are some of the prime contractors and system suppliers based in the region, where t he sector supports and relies on over 500 supply-chain companies. Main suppliers include Smiths Aerospace, Goodrich and the BAE Systems Avionics Group. In total, the industry provides an estimated 44,500 jobs in the region. It is predicted that these numbers are likely to increase, as there is a growth trend in the sector.

As the aerospace industry is prominent in the region, this study has tried to estimate the quantities of products imported, produced, consumed and exported by the industry. This was achieved using products data (ProdCom) provided by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Investigations revealed that the aerospace industry in the South West:

  • Imported over 57,000 tonnes of aircraft and spacecraft related products.
  • Produced over 15,000 tonnes of products.
  • Consumed approximately 35,800 tonnes of materials and products.
  • Exported 37,200 tonnes.

Due to the confidential nature of data in this industry, the most recent and complete data available was for 1999. As some data was unavailable or suppressed, it is likely that the figures mentioned here are an underestimate of what is actually imported, produced, consumed and exported by this industry.

Table 6 provides a more detailed breakdown of the aerospace industry's product flows. The general lack of data on the industry highlights the issues of confidentiality and data availability in the public domain. To develop a better understanding of resource use and efficiency in this sector, it would be helpful for data to be made more freely available.

Table 6
Aerospace industry-related product flows in the South West, in 1999* (tonnes)
 
ProdCom code ProdCom description Production Imports Exports Net supply (consumption)
Total aircraft and spacecraft 15,333 57,674 37,217 35,791
35301100 Aircraft spark-ignition internal combustion piston engines 0 1,560 996 564
35301210-70 Turbojets, turbofans & turboprops ***1,633 3,386 12,038 -7,019
35301300 Reaction engines including: Ramjets, pulse jets & rocket engines 12,931 47,139 18,585 41,485
35301430 Aircraft launching gear & parts thereof, deck-arrestor or similar gear & parts thereof S M M M
35301450 Ground flying trainers & parts thereof 602 M M 602
35301500 Parts for aircraft spark-ignition reciprocating or rotary internal combustion piston engines ** 777 954 -177
35301600 Parts of turbo-jets or turbo-propellers ** 4,812 4,644 168
35302100-200 Gliders, balloons & other non-powered aircrafts ** M M M
35303130-50 Helicopters ***167 M M ***23
35303200-400 Aeroplanes & other aircrafts S M M M
35304000 Spacecraft, satellites & launch vehicles 0 0 0 0
35305030 Propellers and rotors etc for dirigibles, non-powered aircraft, helicopters & aeroplanes ** M M M
35305050 Undercarriages etc for dirigibles, non-powered aircraft, helicopters, aeroplanes, spacecraft & launch vehicles ** M M M
35305090 Parts for all types of aircraft ** M M M
35309100 Repair and maintenance of aircraft & aircraft engines ** M M M
35309230-70 Reconditioning of aeroplane engines, aeroplanes & other aircraft ** M M M
* The data in this table should be viewed with caution. Due to confidentiality, many industries have not supplied the ONS with their sales figures, as illustrated by the data gaps.
** No data available.
*** This figure contains suppressed data.
S Suppressed data.
M Data could not be calculated due to missing or suppressed figures.
Source: ONS, 2001

Sources: Mair & Field, 2002; Mair & UK Research Partnership, 2002; ONS, 2001; SWRDA, 2003 and WEAF, 2003.